Comments: Rockstars

This is parody, right? I really haven't read anything this funny in a long time; it's Steve Colbert-worthy material.

I really hate to break it to you but music--especially commercial music--has zip to with colleges and universities, other than many bands play college venues because that's where the audiences are. And record companies could care less about content, so long as it sells. This explains Marilyn Manson and the various American Idol-Boy Band-Heavy Metal act variations. Hey, most record labels would record the sound of a cat being beaten against a wall if they thought it would sell.

The fact is guns appeal to a very narrow segment of American society. And even within that narrow segment, many gun owners rightly recognize firearms as implements for hunting or target shooting. IOW, nobody is really wondering why there aren't more songs about lawnmowers or tabletop saws.

Posted by JadeGold at September 18, 2006 05:17 PM

Almost cut my hair
It happened just the other day
Was gettin' kinda long
I could have said it was in my way

But I didn't, and I wonder why
I felt like letting my freak flag fly
I feel ... like I owe it
To someone

Posted by jed at September 18, 2006 08:15 PM

Jade,
My sole purpose in this universe is to amuse you. giving you aformat for your less than spot on opinions is a secondary thing it seems.

Now as I pointed out it was anecdotal, but in my experience in the music biz at least half of the musicians I worked with had been to college for some length of time. there are a number of high school grads & some that didn't even make it out of high school, but musicians are generally an educated lot - at least in music. some formal training is usually present & most times that training occurred at a college.

But i must ask you something & hope you'll give an honest & direct answer this time. In all the comments that you've left on here you've been generally opposed to my writings & caused arguments from a few of my readers. No one has chipped in on your side of whatever point you were trying to make. So my question is why are you here? Do you really think you'll change someone's mind or do you just enjoy debate with folks who'll you'll neevr win over?

Jed,

CSN. I'll neglect the "Y' considering my upbringing. :P

Posted by Publicola at September 19, 2006 12:04 AM

Pubs:

The problem with anecdotes is that they're generally a very poor substitute for the facts. And when you make broad, sweeping assertions that the reason we don't see more songs celebrating guns is because the industry side and colleges all collude to suppress all those budding NRA artists--it's based on nonsense.

So my question is why are you here? Do you really think you'll change someone's mind or do you just enjoy debate with folks who'll you'll neevr win over?

You'd be surprised at how many I do win over; it's not generally those who engage in 'debate'--it's often those on the sidelines. Fortunately, there are many gunowners/enthusiasts that recognize responsibility comes with ownership and don't regard firearms as some holy icon handed down from on high.

However, it's your forum and if you want it dedicated to preaching to the choir--I'll gladly retreat.

Posted by JadeGold at September 19, 2006 04:46 PM

Ever heard "Kiss my Glock" by Ted Nugent?

http://youtube.com/watch?v=QiYyHNgeFA8

Posted by Hyunchback at September 19, 2006 08:53 PM

I've got a .38 Special on a .44 frame.
How can I miss when I've got dead aim.

Old blues song I first heard before Dylan sold out and went electric, but I only learned recently that this was the ancestor of the .357 Magnum. See the 2007 Gun Digest for a writeup of the S&W Outdoorsman. My understanding is that this actually started as a homebrew wildcat.

Posted by triticale at September 24, 2006 07:36 PM

Jade I've generally thought that if anyone got really impolite I'd ask them to leave. Since my policy did not reflect on ill conceieved logic then you're most welcome to stick around. :P

what seems so problematic with you is that either I have a problem with my writing or you have a problem with your comprehension. Since a fair number of folks seem to get the gist of what I verbosely try to discuss I'll assume it's the latter. You seem to latch on to one thing & assume that's a thesis when usually it involves a broader set of facts or incidences that lead to a different conclusion.

What I was trying to say was that several things contribute to the generally negative view that the music biz takes on firearms as reflected by some of the more popular tunes. Among those are the biases that pervade colleges as well as the cultural norms of the major recording studios' locations which influence marketing & production (which is a "cater to the audience you know" thing). In addition to that there's the (perhaps main) problem of pro-gun/pro-individual freedom tunes not being as easy to write because the ideas involved are a bit more complex than their rival idealogies.

But I do agree - if most labels thought cat beating against a wall would make a hit they'd all be cleaning out the pound of strays. & some of the singers I've worked for - I'd take the cat anyday of the week if the money was close. As for no songs about lawnmowers or table top saws - I recall a few verses here & there about steamrollers, chainsaws, & a john deere. :)

But I was not so much bitching about having songs with firearms as their main focus, but having songs which mentioned firearms in a positive light despite the positive or nuetral light that they should be viewed in.

Posted by Publicola at October 2, 2006 12:05 AM